Blood, 2020
Authors
Ryan D Morin, David W Scott

Cancer Cell, 2020
Authors
Jian Carrot-Zhang, Nyasha Chambwe, Jeffrey S Damrauer, Theo A Knijnenburg, A Gordon Robertson, Christina Yau, Wanding Zhou, Ashton C Berger, Kuan-Lin Huang, Justin Y Newberg, R Jay Mashl, Alessandro Romanel, Rosalyn W Sayaman, Francesca Demichelis, Ina Felau, Garrett M Frampton, Seunghun Han, Katherine A Hoadley, Anab Kemal, Peter W Laird, Alexander J Lazar, Xiuning Le, Ninad Oak, Hui Shen, Christopher K Wong, Jean C Zenklusen, Elad Ziv, Andrew D Cherniack, Rameen Beroukhim
Publication Abstract

We evaluated ancestry effects on mutation rates, DNA methylation, and mRNA and miRNA expression among 10,678 patients across 33 cancer types from The Cancer Genome Atlas. We demonstrated that cancer subtypes and ancestry-related technical artifacts are important confounders that have been insufficiently accounted for. Once accounted for, ancestry-associated differences spanned all molecular features and hundreds of genes. Biologically significant differences were usually tissue specific but not specific to cancer. However, admixture and pathway analyses suggested some of these differences are causally related to cancer. Specific findings included increased FBXW7 mutations in patients of African origin, decreased VHL and PBRM1 mutations in renal cancer patients of African origin, and decreased immune activity in bladder cancer patients of East Asian origin.

Blood, 2020
Authors
Jennifer Margaret Grants, Joanna Wegrzyn-Woltosz, Tony Hui, Kieran O'Neill, Marion Shadbolt, David J H F Knapp, Jeremy Dk Parker, Deborah Deng, Aparna Gopal, T Roderick Docking, Megan Fuller, Jenny Li, Mark Boldin, Connie J Eaves, Martin Hirst, Aly Karsan
Publication Abstract

Aging is associated with significant changes in the hematopoietic system, including increased inflammation, impaired hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) function, and increased incidence of myeloid malignancy. Inflammation of aging ("inflammaging") has been proposed as a driver of age-related changes in HSC function and myeloid malignancy, but mechanisms linking these phenomena remain poorly defined. Here, we identify loss of miR-146a as driving aging-associated inflammation in AML patients. miR-146a expression declined in old wild-type mice, and loss of miR-146a promoted premature HSC aging and inflammation in young miR-146a-null mice, preceding development of aging-associated myeloid malignancy. Using single-cell assays of HSC quiescence, stemness, differentiation potential, and epigenetic state to probe HSC function and population structure, we found that loss of miR-146a depleted a subpopulation of primitive, quiescent HSCs. DNA methylation and transcriptome profiling implicated NF-κB, IL6, and TNF as potential drivers of HSC dysfunction, activating an inflammatory signaling relay promoting IL6 and TNF secretion from mature miR-146a-/- myeloid and lymphoid cells. Reducing inflammation by targeting Il6 or Tnf was sufficient to restore single-cell measures of miR-146a-/-HSC function and subpopulation structure, and reduced the incidence of hematological malignancy in miR‑146a-/-mice. miR-146a-/- HSCs exhibited enhanced sensitivity to IL6 stimulation, indicating that loss of miR-146a affects HSC function via both cell-extrinsic inflammatory signals and increased cell-intrinsic sensitivity to inflammation. Thus, loss of miR‑146a regulates cell-extrinsic and -intrinsic mechanisms linking HSC inflammaging to the development of myeloid malignancy.

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Nature Cancer, 2020
Authors
Erin Pleasance, Emma Titmuss, Laura Williamson, Harwood Kwan, Luka Culibrk, Eric Y. Zhao, Katherine Dixon, Kevin Fan, Reanne Bowlby, Martin R. Jones, Yaoqing Shen, Jasleen K. Grewal, Jahanshah Ashkani, Kathleen Wee, Cameron J. Grisdale, My Linh Thibodeau, Zoltan Bozoky, Hillary Pearson, Elisa Majounie, Tariq Vira, Reva Shenwai, Karen L. Mungall, Eric Chuah, Anna Davies, Mya Warren, Caralyn Reisle, Melika Bonakdar, Gregory A. Taylor, Veronika Csizmok, Simon K. Chan, Zusheng Zong, Steve Bilobram, Amir Muhammadzadeh, Darryl D’Souza, Richard D. Corbett, Daniel MacMillan, Marcus Carreira, Caleb Choo, Dustin Bleile, Sara Sadeghi, Wei Zhang, Tina Wong, Dean Cheng, Scott D. Brown, Robert A. Holt, Richard A. Moore, Andrew J. Mungall, Yongjun Zhao, Jessica Nelson, Alexandra Fok, Yussanne Ma, Michael K. C. Lee, Jean-Michel Lavoie, Shehara Mendis, Joanna M. Karasinska, Balvir Deol, Ana Fisic, David F. Schaeffer, Stephen Yip, Kasmintan Schrader, Dean A. Regier, Deirdre Weymann, Stephen Chia, Karen Gelmon, Anna Tinker, Sophie Sun, Howard Lim, Daniel J. Renouf, Janessa Laskin, Steven J. M. Jones & Marco A. Marra
Publication Abstract

Advanced and metastatic tumors with complex treatment histories drive cancer mortality. Here we describe the POG570 cohort, a comprehensive whole-genome, transcriptome and clinical dataset, amenable for exploration of the impacts of therapies on genomic landscapes. Previous exposure to DNA-damaging chemotherapies and mutations affecting DNA repair genes, including POLQ and genes encoding Polζ, were associated with genome-wide, therapy-induced mutagenesis. Exposure to platinum therapies coincided with signatures SBS31 and DSB5 and, when combined with DNA synthesis inhibitors, signature SBS17b. Alterations in ESR1, EGFR, CTNNB1, FGFR1, VEGFA and DPYD were consistent with drug resistance and sensitivity. Recurrent noncoding events were found in regulatory region hotspots of genes including TERT, PLEKHS1, AP2A1 and ADGRG6. Mutation burden and immune signatures corresponded with overall survival and response to immunotherapy. Our data offer a rich resource for investigation of advanced cancers and interpretation of whole-genome and transcriptome sequencing in the context of a cancer clinic.

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Bioinformatics, 2020
Authors
Lauren Coombe , Vladimir Nikolić, Justin Chu, Inanc Birol, René L Warren
Publication Abstract

Summary: The ability to generate high-quality genome sequences is cornerstone to modern biological research. Even with recent advancements in sequencing technologies, many genome assemblies are still not achieving reference-grade. Here, we introduce ntJoin, a tool that leverages structural synteny between a draft assembly and reference sequence(s) to contiguate and correct the former with respect to the latter. Instead of alignments, ntJoin uses a lightweight mapping approach based on a graph data structure generated from ordered minimizer sketches. The tool can be used in a variety of different applications, including improving a draft assembly with a reference-grade genome, a short read assembly with a draft long read assembly, and a draft assembly with an assembly from a closely-related species. When scaffolding a human short read assembly using the reference human genome or a long read assembly, ntJoin improves the NGA50 length 23- and 13-fold, respectively, in under 13 m, using less than 11 GB of RAM. Compared to existing reference-guided scaffolders, ntJoin generates highly contiguous assemblies faster and using less memory.

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Cell Reports, 2020
Authors
Artem Babaian, Katharina Rothe, Dylan Girodat, Igor Minia, Sara Djondovic, Miha Milek, Sandra E Spencer Miko, Hans-Joachim Wieden, Markus Landthaler, Gregg B Morin, Dixie L Mager
Publication Abstract

The ribosome is an RNA-protein complex that is essential for translation in all domains of life. The structural and catalytic core of the ribosome is its ribosomal RNA (rRNA). While mutations in ribosomal protein (RP) genes are known drivers of oncogenesis, oncogenic rRNA variants have remained elusive. We identify a cancer-specific single-nucleotide variation in 18S rRNA at nucleotide 1248.U in up to 45.9% of patients with colorectal carcinoma (CRC) and present across >22 cancer types. This is the site of a unique hyper-modified base, 1-methyl-3-α-amino-α-carboxyl-propyl pseudouridine (m1acp3Ψ), a >1-billion-years-conserved RNA modification at the peptidyl decoding site of the ribosome. A subset of CRC tumors we call hypo-m1acp3Ψ shows sub-stoichiometric m1acp3Ψ modification, unlike normal control tissues. An m1acp3Ψ knockout model and hypo-m1acp3Ψ patient tumors share a translational signature characterized by highly abundant ribosomal proteins. Thus, m1acp3Ψ-deficient rRNA forms an uncharacterized class of “onco-ribosome” which may serve as a chemotherapeutic target for treating cancer patients.

Blood, 2020
Authors
Luca Malcovati, Kristen Stevenson, Elli Papaemmanuil, Donna Neuberg, Rafael Bejar, Jacqueline Boultwood, David T Bowen, Peter J Campbell, Benjamin L Ebert, Pierre Fenaux, Torsten Haferlach, Michael Heuser, Joop H Jansen, Rami S Komrokji, Jaroslaw P Maciejewski, Matthew J Walter, Michaela Fontenay, Guillermo Garcia-Manero, Timothy A Graubert, Aly Karsan, Manja Meggendorfer, Andrea Pellagatti, David A Sallman, Michael R Savona, Mikkael Sekeres, David P Steensma, Sudhir Tauro, Felicitas Thol, Paresh Vyas, Arjan A Van de Loosdrecht, Detlef Thomas Haase, Heinz Tuechler, Peter L Greenberg, Seishi Ogawa, Eva S Hellstrom-Lindberg, Mario Cazzola.
Publication Abstract

The 2016 revision of the World Health Organization (WHO) classification of tumors of hematopoietic and lymphoid tissues is characterized by a closer integration of morphology and molecular genetics. Notwithstanding, the myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) with isolated del(5q) remains so far the only MDS subtype defined by a genetic abnormality. About half of MDS patients carry somatic mutations in spliceosome genes, with SF3B1 being the most commonly mutated one. SF3B1 mutation identifies a condition characterized by ring sideroblasts, ineffective erythropoiesis, and indolent clinical course. A large body of evidence supports recognition of SF3B1-mutant MDS as a distinct nosologic entity. To further validate this notion, we interrogated the dataset of the International Working Group for the Prognosis of MDS (IWG-PM). Based on the findings of our analyses, we propose the following diagnostic criteria for SF3B1-mutant MDS: (i) cytopenia as defined by standard hematologic values; (ii) somatic SF3B1 mutation; (iii) morphologic dysplasia (with or without ring sideroblasts); (iv) bone marrow blasts <5% and peripheral blood blasts <1%. Selected concomitant genetic lesions represent exclusion criteria for the proposed entity. In patients with clonal cytopenia of undetermined significance, SF3B1 mutation is almost invariably associated with subsequent development of overt MDS with ring sideroblasts, suggesting that this genetic lesion provides presumptive evidence of MDS in the setting of persistent unexplained cytopenia. Diagnosis of SF3B1-mutant MDS has considerable clinical implications in terms of risk stratification and therapeutic decision making. In fact, this condition has a relatively good prognosis and may respond to luspatercept with abolishment of transfusion requirement.

Human Pathology
Authors
Basile Tessier-Cloutier, Dawn R Cochrane, Anthony N Karnezis, Shane Colborne, Jamie Magrill, Aline Talhouk, Jonathan Zhang, Samuel Leung, Christopher S Hughes, Anna Piskorz, Angela S Cheng, Kendall Greening, Andreas du Bois, Jacobus Pfisterer, Robert A Soslow, Stefan Kommoss, James D Brenton, Gregg B Morin, C Blake Gilks, David G Huntsman, Friedrich Kommoss.
Publication Abstract

The current WHO classification does not separate transitional cell-like carcinoma of the ovary (TCC) from conventional tubo-ovarian high-grade serous carcinoma (HGSC), despite evidence suggesting improved prognosis for patients with TCC; it is considered, instead a morphologic variant of HGSC. The immunohistochemical (IHC) markers applied to date do not distinguish between TCC and HGSC. Therefore, we sought to compare the proteomic profiles of TCC and conventional HGSC to identify proteins enriched in TCC. Prognostic biomarkers in HGSC have proven elusive and our aim was to identify biomarkers of TCC as a way of reliably and reproducibly identifying patients with a favorable prognosis and better response to chemotherapy compared to those with conventional HGSC. Quantitative global proteome analysis was performed on archival material of 12 cases of TCC and 16 cases of HGSC using SP3-CTP, a recently described protocol for full proteome analysis from formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tissues. We identified 430 proteins that were significantly enriched in TCC over HGSC. Unsupervised co-clustering perfectly separated TCC from HGSC based on protein expression. Pathway analysis showed that proteins associated with cell death, necrosis and apoptosis were highly expressed in TCCs, while DNA homologous recombination, cell mitosis, proliferation and survival and cell cycle progression pathways had reduced expression. From the proteomic analysis, three potential biomarkers for TCC were identified, claudin-4 (CLDN4), ubiquitin carboxyl-terminal esterase L1 (UCHL1) and minichromosome maintenance protein 7 (MCM7) and tested by IHC on tissue microarrays. In agreement with the proteomic analysis, IHC expression for those proteins was stronger in TCC compared to HGSC (p<0.0001). Using global proteomic analysis, we are able to separate TCC from conventional HGSC. Follow up studies will be necessary to confirm that these molecular and morphologic differences are clinically significant.

Nucleic Acids Research, 2020
Authors
Nawar Malhis, Matthew Jacobson, Steven J M Jones, Jörg Gsponer
Publication Abstract

The separation of deleterious from benign mutations remains a key challenge in the interpretation of genomic data. Computational methods used to sort mutations based on their potential deleteriousness rely largely on conservation measures derived from sequence alignments. Here, we introduce LIST-S2, a successor to our previously developed approach LIST, which aims to exploit local sequence identity and taxonomy distances in quantifying the conservation of human protein sequences. Unlike its predecessor, LIST-S2 is not limited to human sequences but can assess conservation and make predictions for sequences from any organism. Moreover, we provide a web-tool and downloadable software to compute and visualize the deleteriousness of mutations in user-provided sequences. This web-tool contains an HTML interface and a RESTful API to submit and manage sequences as well as a browsable set of precomputed predictions for a large number of UniProtKB protein sequences of common taxa. LIST-S2 is available at: https://list-s2.msl.ubc.ca/

Journal of Proteome Research, 2020
Authors
Jianhui Cheng, Lingyu Wang, Craig M Rive, Robert A Holt, Gregg B Morin, David D Y Chen
Publication Abstract

Mass spectrometry is a powerful tool for de novo sequencing of novel proteins. Recent efforts in this area have mainly focused on liquid chromatography coupled with tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). Here, we present an alternative method, capillary electrophoresis tandem mass spectrometry (CE-MS/MS), for sequencing novel monoclonal antibodies. Using less than 200 ng in total of tryptic digest sample in a triplicated measurement, CE-MS/MS with pH-mediated focusing successfully sequenced mAb infliximab with 100% sequence coverage and 100% accuracy for the light chain and 96% coverage and 93% accuracy for the heavy chain. It was also demonstrated that CE-MS/MS gives comparable results, and in some cases, even better results, as compared to LC-MS/MS when used as a standalone technique. A combined workflow using both CE-MS/MS and LC-MS/MS was also used to sequence a novel antibody, anti-CD-176, resulting in the first proposed sequence for this mAb.

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